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Facts about Sexually Transmitted Infections and the way to protect us from the STDs Virus

Rise Of STIs

Abstract

Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STD) remain very prevalent in the population. It is therefore of great value to be aware of the importance of screening asymptomatic individuals.This allows to both avoid further infections and to prevent complications in infected patients. An overview of the current prevalence of STDs will be provided together with a review of the most common ones encountered in clinical practice. In addition a specific assessment of the current state of HIV disease will be presented. This will include a discussion on its worldwide and local impact on the population.

Introduction

Sexually transmitted diseases(STDs) are infections that pass from one person to another through sexual contact. Some STDs can spread through the use of unsterilized drug needles, from mother to infant during childbirth or breast-feeding,and blood transfusions. People can transmit microorganisms that inhabit the skin or mucous membranes of the genitals. Infectious organisms can also move between people in semen, vaginal secretions, or blood during sexual intercourse.

Chlamydia 

It is an STD caused by chlamydia trachomatis.This bacterium only infects humans. Chlamydia is the most common infectious cause of genital and eye diseases globally. It is also the most common bacterial STD. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in 2015, nearly 3 percent of girls aged 15 to 19 years had chlamydia. Women with chlamydia do not usually show symptoms.Any symptoms are usually non-specific and may include:

  • bladder infection
  • a change in vaginal discharge
  • mild lower abdomen pain

Chancroid

It is also known as soft chancre and ulcus molle.It is bacterial infection caused by caleed streptobacillus Haemophilus ducreyi. The infection causes painful sores on the genitals and is only spreads through sexual contact. Women often have at least four ulcers,while men usually have just one. Males tend to have fewer and less severe symptoms. The ulcers typically appear at the back of the glans penis in uncircumcised males, or, in females, on the labia minora or fourchette.

Genital Herpes

This STD is caused by the herpes simplex virus(HSV).The virus affects the skin, cervix, genitals, and some other parts of the body. There are two types:

  • HSV-1
  • HSV-2

HSV is easily transmissible from human to human through direct contact.Most commonly,transmission of type 2 HSV ocrs through vaginal,orral,or anal sex. Type 1 is more commonly transmitted from shared straws,utensils,and surfaces. The symptoms associated with genital herpes,if they do occur,may include:

  • vaginal discharge
  • pain on urinating
  • fever
  • generally feeling unwell
  • cold sores

Hepatitis B

It is transmitted through contact with infected semen, blood, and other bodily fluids. Hepatitis B is passed on in the following ways:

  • unprotected sex
  • using an unsterilized syringe
  • drinking infected breast milk
  • being bitten by a person with hepatitis

Emerging issues in sexually transmitted diseases

Each state must address system-level barriers to timely treatment of partners of persons infected with STDs, including the implementation of expedited partner therapy for the treatment of chlamydia and gonorrheal infections. Enhanced data collection on demographic and behavioral variables, such as the sex of an infected person’s sex partner(s), is essential to understanding the epidemiology of STD and to guiding prevention efforts. 

Treatment                 

Most STDs can be effectively treated with drugs (antibiotics for bacterial infections and antiviral drugs for viral infections). However, some new strains of bacteria and viruses have become resistant to some drugs, making treatment more difficult Resistance to drugs is likely to increase because drugs are sometimes misused.

  • Antibiotics or antiviral drugs depending on the STD
  • Simultaneous treatment of sex partners

People who are being treated for a bacterial STD should abstain from intercourse until the infection has been eliminated from them and their sex partners. Thus sex partners should be tested and treated simultaneously. Viral STDs, especially herpes and HIV infection, usually persist for life. Antiviral drugs can control but not yet cure these infections.

Conclusion

In general,the studies reported low levels of awareness and knowledge of sexually transmitted diseases,with the exception of HIV/AIDS.Beyond HIV/AIDS,attention should be paid to infections such as chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis. Improved prevention of STDs should be an essential component of a national strategy for preventing sexually transmitted HIV infection. Government agencies and private organizations concerned with cancer prevention should support STD prevention activities as an important strategy for prevention of STD-related cancers.

 

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8 thoughts on “Facts about Sexually Transmitted Infections and the way to protect us from the STDs Virus

  • Owen Graham says:

    Not good to get the clap from a one-night stand. Always put on your condom! Anyhow I woke up one day to feel my privates burn and drip with an angry passion that shouldn’t have been happening. Thankfully, my doctor was understanding of my condition and put me on an antibiotic that cleared it up in only a few days. Now I am much more careful.

  • Cameron Edwards says:

    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are infections you can get by having sex with someone who has an infection. These infections are usually passed from person to person through vaginal intercourse. They can also be passed through anal sex, oral sex, or skin-to-skin contact.Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are infections that pass from one person to another through sexual contact. They are also known as sexually transmitted infections (STIs) or venereal diseases (VD). … Infectious organisms can also move between people in semen, vaginal secretions, or blood during sexual intercourse.

  • Braxton Glenn says:

    Like many, I was/am pretty well educated on STDs. However, I still felt that I was “invincible” to sexual diseases and NEVER would have expected to get one.
    I have had three partners—all long-term serious relationships. At age seventeen, I’m not what most would expect an “HPV infected person(s)” to be. I graduated two years early, I was a cheerleader for my college, I graduated high school with a 4.0, I’ve held 2 state beauty pageant titles, and currently hold a local title on my way to state! The important thing is—NO ONE is invincible, and it can happen to ANYBODY. That’s part of the risk we take being sexually active.

    In my case, knowledge is power. I discovered “skin-tag-like” warts on and around my vaginal opening. I figured it was an allergic reaction to a bubble bath or something. After a week of no improvements, I did research on genital warts on the internet. I was almost positive I had them. I told me mother and we went to the doctor, and I am now undergoing treatment.

    Unlike many others, I was able to trace the source of my STD. It was my first boyfriend and first partner. He had no idea he was carrying the virus (since there are often no symptoms). Since me, he has had over 10 partners…meaning possibly infecting over 10 people. They say, “You sleep with whoever your partner has slept with.” Never has the saying affected me more. I called him and told him what I had, what he had, what he should do (regarding telling his past partners), treatment he should seek, and other key facts. Once again, knowledge is power.

    I also called my most recent ex and partner in addition to the first. I was screamed at, and cursed, and he even threatened to kill me. It brought out a side I had never seen. It hurt, but I did the right thing. I now understand why STD prevention may be difficult–it is hard to tell someone, especially when you get such a harsh reaction. I can’t lie. It was embarrassing, heartbreaking, and shameful. But as I told him, STDs are just one part of the risk we take from being sexually active, especially as teens.

    Now to my third partner—my fiance. I have infected him. We are going to a clinic (so his parents won’t find out) next week for him. Luckily there are many low cost and even free STD screening and treatment centers for cases just like this. It was so hard for us to get through this. He, unlike me, waited for “the one” before having sex. Being honored, I never once thought that I might be capable of transmitting a disease to him. As he put it at first, “It’s like working and working and working hard for something your whole life- and then having it blow up in your face.”

    Yes, I gave my love an STD. The “perfect” varsity player with perfect grades. We found out that knowledge/education and communication is key. Though my communication issues were a bit more than just between us, it was something that had to be done. Something to think about. My first partner was angry, and so embarrassed, he refuses to tell the 10+ people he slept with. Assuming they follow a pattern, in a years span (since he started having sex with others)- they sleep with three males. That’s over 30 people infected because of someone not speaking the truth.

    I have HPV. So does my fiance. We are normal- perhaps even considered “exceptional”—college students. His past: 0 partners. My past: 2 partners. All protected sex. We have HPV for the rest of my life. But we get through it together.

  • Hunter Ellis says:

    My friend contracted Syphilis while on holiday to Europe. He tried his luck in the red light district and got more then he bargained for. He might be on antibiotics for a while, i do not think his wife approves.

  • Finn Harvey says:

    My friend got the clap from a long term friendly relationship. They went to the clinic together and got their treatments together. It brought them closer. His girlfriend originally got the clap from riding the bus. The whole situation has really taken their relationship down the road. You could say they are on the path to somewhere.

  • Ashton Burke says:

    Log in to Patient Account · English … Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) — or sexually transmitted infections … Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. … from the penis; Unusual or odd-smelling vaginal discharge; Unusual … Oral sex may be less risky, but infections can still be transmittedSexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are infections that are passed from one person to another through sexual contact. The causes of STDs are bacteria, parasites, yeast, and viruses. There are more than 20 types of STDs, including. Chlamydia. Genital herpes.No symptoms.
    Discharge (thick or thin, milky white, yellow, or green leakage from the vagina)
    Vaginal itching.
    Vaginal blisters or blisters in the genital area (the region covered by underwear)
    Vaginal rash or rash in the genital area.
    Burning urination.
    Painful urination.
    Pain during intercourse.

  • Marcus Blair says:

    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are infections you can get by having sex with someone who has an infection. These infections are usually passed from person to person through vaginal intercourse. They can also be passed through anal sex, oral sex, or skin-to-skin contact.

  • Spencer Monk says:

    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are infections you can get by having sex with someone who has an infection. These infections are usually passed from person to person through vaginal intercourse. They can also be passed through anal sex, oral sex, or skin-to-skin contact, Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are infections that pass from one person to another through sexual contact. They are also known as sexually transmitted infections (STIs) or venereal diseases (VD). … Infectious organisms can also move between people in semen, vaginal secretions, or blood during sexual intercourse. Antibiotics. Antibiotics, often in a single dose, can cure many sexually transmitted bacterial and parasitic infections, including gonorrhea, syphilis, chlamydia and trichomoniasis. …
    Antiviral drugs.No symptoms.
    Discharge (thick or thin, milky white, yellow, or green leakage from the vagina)
    Vaginal itching.
    Vaginal blisters or blisters in the genital area (the region covered by underwear)
    Vaginal rash or rash in the genital area.
    Burning urination.
    Painful urination.
    Pain during intercours

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